SRAM Red 2012

  • Posted: 7th June 2012

If there’s one thing you can bet your life on people saying when a new groupset comes out, it’s that “the other manufacturers better get cracking or they’ll be left behind.” This has been even truer since Shimano released their electronic, Di2 and especially since the Ultegra version.

The feeling seems to be that the Campagnolo and SRAM manufacturers have been sitting in their offices with their hands on their cheeks and mouths open like Munch’s The Scream moaning, “What are we going to do?”

Well, obviously these sorts of companies don’t just rest on their laurels. They’d be out of business pretty quickly if they did. Rather, they have many staff who are constantly at work on research and development. We saw Campagnolo release their EPS groupset late last year and now SRAM have put the updated Red groupset onto the market.

Here at Bicycling Australia we’ve been pleased to have one of the pre production versions of Red to test for a few weeks. The groupset The brakes are nice and beefy with excellent stopping power. Note the shape of the opening and closing mechanism which is turned backwards when closed and therefore more aero.The brakes are nice and beefy with excellent stopping power. Note the shape of the opening and closing mechanism which is turned backwards when closed and therefore more aero.is one of two sent to Australia by SRAM mounted onto a Cannondale Evo Super Six with a pair of Zipp 303 Firecrests. While the Zipps aren’t that surprising given SRAM took over the company in 2007, a cynic might say the Cannondale was a wise choice if you wanted to make the groupset look good. Not only is it a lightweight frame (6.4kg complete bike weight including the Zipps for the 56cm), its matt black paint job makes the finish of the Red absolutely look the goods. To me, it’s a shrewd move.

Personally, I was very interested to test this new Red. SRAM to me has always been a love it or loathe it groupset, though I guess you could say that about all groupsets. Some people like the DoubleTap shifting, others don’t. Other people may have felt that the hoods were a bit low, but if there was one criticism that you heard regularly it was the action of the front derailleur. It has been said to be hard to move back into the big ring, fussy to adjust and prone to going out of trim. And while it can’t be denied that a groupset that has helped a large number riders make the podium on the Champs Elysees must have a number of good qualities, urban myths and internet fancies are hard to ignore. So let’s have a look at how SRAM have improved the new Red for 2012.

Overall Weight

SRAM Red has always been a player in the lightweight stakes, so weight weenies will be please to know that the new groupset weighs 1,739 grams, about 150g less than the previous incarnation. Here are the individual weights:

Shifters:  280g

Rear Derailleur:  145g

Front Derailleur:  86g

BB30 cranks:  557g

Bottom Bracket:  53g

Brakes:  240g

Cassette:  135g (11-23T)

Chain:  255g

Cranking It Out

There’s some interesting stuff happening with the cranks to help that weight loss along. They’re completely hollow and in the same way that frame manufacturers use oversize tubes to add stiffness, SRAM have made these pretty beefy. What’s new is not so much the fact that the cranks are hollow, but that the hollow section extends right into the carbon spider. This is still a five-bolt construction, however, one of the bolts is hidden behind the crank arm.

The cranks are completely hollow extending right into the spider. The chain rings have slightly increased in size and have modified ramps and pins. The new SRAM cranks are also available with Quarq power meters for an additional price.The cranks are completely hollow extending right into the spider. The chain rings have slightly increased in size and have modified ramps and pins. The new SRAM cranks are also available with Quarq power meters for an additional price.

Another first is the possibility of having your Red groupset supplied with Quarq power cranks. SRAM have made some pretty good acquisitions over the years and their takeover of Quarq nearly two years ago is beginning to pay dividends now. However they haven’t just bunged one in there. This power meter has been specifically designed to sit perfectly in the hollow spider and now uses a standard CR2032 battery, which is one of those 10-cent piece sized ones that you can buy from any supermarket. Quarq estimate that you should get around 300 hours of use per battery. Provided you own a compatible computer they have also added left and right balance, via a bottom bracket magnet, a visible transmitting LED and have improved the accuracy of readings by 0.5 of a per cent. The Quarq cranks should add around 170g to the entire package over the standard cranks.

True to form, the chainrings have also been slightly changed. Slightly thicker, they have modified pins and ramps. They’re also slightly farther apart to allow for the new front derailleur, which brings us to…

Yaw

The front derailleur mechanism probably constitutes the biggest change for the new Red groupset. As mentioned, this is an area that most people felt could be improved and SRAM have stepped up to the crease with a complete new design. The cage is a conglomeration of aluminium (outer plate), steel (inner plate) and This is the really interesting part of the new release. Called ‘Yaw’ the rear section of the derailleur pivots depending whether you are in the big ring or the small. This allows optimal gear changes while still preventing chain rub.This is the really interesting part of the new release. Called ‘Yaw’ the rear section of the derailleur pivots depending whether you are in the big ring or the small. This allows optimal gear changes while still preventing chain rub.carbon at the tail. Called ‘yaw’, this new derailleur twists slightly as you push or flick it onto the different rings. The idea is to eliminate the need for trim while still keeping the cage itself narrow easy shifting. Previously, you had to really haul the front derailleur onto the big ring but I found this new one to be a huge improvement. It is lighter and the throw isn’t so far. In the entire time I had this system on test I didn’t have a single miss-throw or dud shift. I did have a bit of rub when riding in both of the big rings. And while we all know you shouldn’t do this, there are people who still do. Hopefully the quality of the front shifting will mean that we can all be a little less lazy when it comes to using it.

The Back End

While most of the attention will, rightly, concentrate on the front mech there’s been a certain amount of work on the rear as well. The rear derailleur is still 10 speed obviously, but I did note that the SRAM representative asked me after the test what were my thoughts on 11 speed. So who knows where that might be going. Anyway, the standard cage is now slightly longer, meaning that the 28T cog canAt the rear end it’s all about reducing chain noise. The cluster has an elastomer between each cog and the jockey wheels on the rear derailleur have been shaped in a way that SRAM call ‘Aeroglide’. At the rear end it’s all about reducing chain noise. The cluster has an elastomer between each cog and the jockey wheels on the rear derailleur have been shaped in a way that SRAM call ‘Aeroglide’. be accommodated with ease. And of course there will be a long version for use with the Apex 32T cluster. The carbon cage itself has had the same treatment as the cranks, being bigger and therefore stronger and the adjustment for the gears is hidden away for protection.